Two Drops of Brown in a Cloud of White

Two Drops of Brown in a Cloud of White

Illustrated by: Campbell, Eva
ages 3 to 7 / grades P to 2

A child’s joy on a snowy day finally helps her mother feel at home in their new country

A little girl and her mother walk home from school on a snowy winter day.

“So much snow,” says Ma. “So monochromatic.”

“Mono crow what?” her daughter replies.

Ma misses the sun, warmth and colors of their faraway homeland, but her daughter sees magic in everything — the clouds in the winter sky, the “firework” display when she throws an armful of snow into the air, making snow angels, tasting snowflakes. And in the end, her joy is contagious. Home is where family is, after all.

This gently layered, beautifully illustrated story unfolds as a conversation between a mother and daughter and will resonate with readers across generations.

Correlates to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.6
Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.6
Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described.

A child’s joy on a snowy day finally helps her mother feel at home in their new country

A little girl and her mother walk home from school on a snowy winter day.

“So much snow,” says Ma. “So monochromatic.”

“Mono crow what?” her daughter replies.

Ma misses the sun, warmth and colors of their faraway homeland, but her daughter sees magic in everything — the clouds in the winter sky, the “firework” display when she throws an armful of snow into the air, making snow angels, tasting snowflakes. And in the end, her joy is contagious. Home is where family is, after all.

This gently layered, beautifully illustrated story unfolds as a conversation between a mother and daughter and will resonate with readers across generations.

Correlates to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.6
Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.6
Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described.

Published By Groundwood Books Ltd - Oct 27, 2020
Specifications 32 pages | 8.75 in x 10.75 in

Praise for author Saumiya Balasubramaniam and illustrator Eva Campbell and Two Drops of Brown in a Cloud of White:

Commended Skipping Stones Honor Award, 2021

Commended CCBC Choice, 2021

CBC Books Best Canadian Picture Books of 2020

Toronto Public Library First and Best, 2020

FOLD Kids Book of the Month, December 2020

Canadian Children’s Book Centre Favourite Reads of 2020

OLA Best Bets Honourable Mention, 2020

“Stellar seasonal picture books, like these, do more than celebrate changes in weather. They are essentially exercises in mindfulness, helping readers find variety, beauty, and moments of gratitude at all times of year.”

Quill & Quire

“An excellent addition to library story-reading programs, especially those which welcome minority parents. This story will definitely encourage some meaningful reflections and thought-provoking conversations.” — CM Review of Materials

“Snow may be cold but Saumiya Balasubramaniam and Eva Campbell's Two Drops of Brown in a Cloud of White creates the warmth of family and acceptance.” — CanLit for Little Canadians

“[A] poignant story.” — Canadian Children’s Book News

“[A] thoughtful, beautiful story about home, belonging, and love.” — Open Book

“The pictures here are exceptional.” — Winnipeg Free Press

“[E]mpowering.” — Bit About Books Blog

“A classic in the making!” — Storytime With Stephanie Blog

Praise for author Saumiya Balasubramaniam and illustrator Qin Leng for

When I Found Grandma:

“Discovering and embracing differences leads to stronger bonds between family members, Balasubramaniam asserts in this subtle, heartfelt story.” — Publishers Weekly

“Balasubramaniam’s honest first-person text and Leng’s soft line-and-color illustrations — which deftly and sympathetically convey the intensity of Maya’s feelings — explore familial love and the intricacies of cross-cultural and intergenerational relationships between very young children and their grandparents.” — Kirkus Reviews

“This gently moving story explores cross-cultural connections in a deeply meaningful way and Leng’s ink and watercolour illustrations wonderfully extend the story.” — Globe and Mail

Praise for author Shauntay Grant and illustrator Eva Campbell for

Africville:

“This story celebrates the beauty and joy of the community seen through a child’s eyes. … There is both pride and longing expressed in the lyrical text, and the vibrant colors and friendly compositions of the oil and pastel illustrations immerse readers in this community.” — School Library Journal, starred review

“Visually, Africville is gorgeous. Eva Campbell’s illustrations are arresting; the colours are warm and inviting, and her painterly style enhances the dreamlike quality of the story.” — Quill & Quire, starred review

“Through the poem, readers visit this sparkling seaside community …. Grant’s evocative descriptions are perfectly matched in tone and timbre with Campbell’s vibrant oil-and-pastel renderings of the town and its residents.” — Booklist