Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox

Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox

Written by: Daniel, Danielle
Illustrated by: Daniel, Danielle
ages 4 to 7 / grades K to 2

Children’s love for animals and disguise come together in this award-winning introduction to the Anishinaabe tradition of totem animals.

In this introduction to the Anishinaabe tradition of totem animals, young children explain why they identify with different creatures such as a deer, beaver or moose. Delightful illustrations show the children wearing masks representing their chosen animal, while the few lines of text on each page work as a series of simple poems throughout the book.

In a brief author’s note, Danielle Daniel explains the importance of totem animals in Anishinaabe culture and how they can also act as animal guides for young children seeking to understand themselves and others.

Key Text Features
author’s note

Correlates to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.K.7
With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.4
Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.4
Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.7
Explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.2
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.7
Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).

Children’s love for animals and disguise come together in this award-winning introduction to the Anishinaabe tradition of totem animals.

In this introduction to the Anishinaabe tradition of totem animals, young children explain why they identify with different creatures such as a deer, beaver or moose. Delightful illustrations show the children wearing masks representing their chosen animal, while the few lines of text on each page work as a series of simple poems throughout the book.

In a brief author’s note, Danielle Daniel explains the importance of totem animals in Anishinaabe culture and how they can also act as animal guides for young children seeking to understand themselves and others.

Key Text Features
author’s note

Correlates to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.K.7
With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.4
Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.4
Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.7
Explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.2
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.7
Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).

Published By Groundwood Books Ltd — Jul 15, 2017
Specifications 40 pages | 8.25 in x 10 in
Supporting Resources
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Teacher's Guide
Written By

DANIELLE DANIEL is an award-winning author and illustrator whose journey into artmaking and book publishing has gone hand in hand with all she has learned — and continues to learn — about her Indigenous ancestry and her relationship with the land. Danielle’s picture books include Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox (winner of the Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award and a Best 100 title at the New York Public Library) and Once in a Blue Moon. She has also illustrated You Hold Me Up by Monique Gray Smith. She is the author of two novels — Forever Birchwood for middle-grade readers and Daughters of the Deer for adults. Danielle holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia and lives in Mnidoo Mnis (Manitoulin Island) with her family.

Illustrated by

DANIELLE DANIEL is an award-winning author and illustrator whose journey into artmaking and book publishing has gone hand in hand with all she has learned — and continues to learn — about her Indigenous ancestry and her relationship with the land. Danielle’s picture books include Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox (winner of the Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award and a Best 100 title at the New York Public Library) and Once in a Blue Moon. She has also illustrated You Hold Me Up by Monique Gray Smith. She is the author of two novels — Forever Birchwood for middle-grade readers and Daughters of the Deer for adults. Danielle holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia and lives in Mnidoo Mnis (Manitoulin Island) with her family.

Commended, 49th Shelf Favourite Picture Books of the Year, 2015

Commended, New York Public Library Best 100 Books for Reading and Sharing, 2015

Commended, TD Summer Reading Club Top Recommended Reads, 2016

Short-listed, Blue Spruce Award, 2017

Winner, Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award, 2016

Commended, CCBC Best Books for Children and Teens, 2016

Commended, CCBC Best Books for Kids and Teens, 2016

A captivating book with an important message.

” —ETFO Voice

Winner, Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award, 2016

Finalist, Blue Spruce Award, 2017

Commended, New York Public Library Best 100 Books for Reading and Sharing, 2015

Commended, TD Summer Reading Club Top Recommended Reads, 2016

Commended, CCBC Best Books for Children and Teens, 2016

Commended, 49th Shelf Favourite Picture Books of the Year, 2015

 

“Reminds readers of the importance of critical self-reflection and of our connection to the animal world — two ideas worth championing at any age.”  — Quill & Quire, starred review

“This book will fascinate children expanding their horizons and learning about other cultures (or, in the case of Anishinaabe kids, their own).” — Kirkus Reviews

“The ideas inside unfurl outside the pages into readers’ own imaginative worlds.” — Boston Globe

“The stylized masks, soft colours and big eyes of the children convey a seriousness, almost an otherworldliness, to the animal/human relationship. . . . Haunting and thought-provoking.” — Toronto Star

“A captivating book with an important message.” — ETFO Voice

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