City of Water

City of Water

Written by: Curtis, Andrea
Illustrated by: Dockrill, Katy
ages 8 to 12 / grades 3 to 7

The second book in the ThinkCities series explores water as a precious, finite resource, tracing its journey from source, through the city, and back again.

Living in cities where water flows effortlessly from our taps and fountains, it’s easy to take it for granted. City of Water, the second book in the ThinkCities series, shines a light on the water system that is vital for our health and well-being. The narrative traces the journey of water from the forests, mountains, lakes, rivers and wetlands that form the watershed, through pipes and treatment facilities, into our taps, fire hydrants and toilets, then out through storm and sewer systems toward wastewater treatment plants and back into the watershed.

Along the way we discover that some of the earliest cities with water systems date back to the Indus Valley in 2500 BC; that in 1920 only 1 percent of the US population had indoor plumbing; that if groundwater is used up too quickly, the land can actually sink; and more. The text is sprinkled with fun and surprising facts — some water fountains in Paris offer sparkling water, and scientists are working to extract microscopic particles of precious metals found in sewage.

Readers are encouraged to think about water as a finite resource, and to take action to prevent our cities and watersheds from becoming more polluted. More than 2 billion people in the world are without access to safe, fresh water at home. As the world’s population grows, along with pollution and climate change, access to clean water is becoming an urgent issue.

Includes practical steps that kids can take to help conserve water.

The ThinkCities series is inspired by the urgency for new approaches to city life as a result of climate change, population growth and increased density. It highlights the challenges and risks cities face, but also offers hope for building resilience, sustainability and quality of life as young people advocate for themselves and their communities.

Correlates to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.3
Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

The second book in the ThinkCities series explores water as a precious, finite resource, tracing its journey from source, through the city, and back again.

Living in cities where water flows effortlessly from our taps and fountains, it’s easy to take it for granted. City of Water, the second book in the ThinkCities series, shines a light on the water system that is vital for our health and well-being. The narrative traces the journey of water from the forests, mountains, lakes, rivers and wetlands that form the watershed, through pipes and treatment facilities, into our taps, fire hydrants and toilets, then out through storm and sewer systems toward wastewater treatment plants and back into the watershed.

Along the way we discover that some of the earliest cities with water systems date back to the Indus Valley in 2500 BC; that in 1920 only 1 percent of the US population had indoor plumbing; that if groundwater is used up too quickly, the land can actually sink; and more. The text is sprinkled with fun and surprising facts — some water fountains in Paris offer sparkling water, and scientists are working to extract microscopic particles of precious metals found in sewage.

Readers are encouraged to think about water as a finite resource, and to take action to prevent our cities and watersheds from becoming more polluted. More than 2 billion people in the world are without access to safe, fresh water at home. As the world’s population grows, along with pollution and climate change, access to clean water is becoming an urgent issue.

Includes practical steps that kids can take to help conserve water.

The ThinkCities series is inspired by the urgency for new approaches to city life as a result of climate change, population growth and increased density. It highlights the challenges and risks cities face, but also offers hope for building resilience, sustainability and quality of life as young people advocate for themselves and their communities.

Correlates to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.3
Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

Published By Groundwood Books Ltd — May 1, 2021
Specifications 40 pages | 8.75 in x 10.625 in
Supporting Resources
(select item to download)
Teacher's Guide
Written By

ANDREA CURTIS’s children’s non-fiction titles include A Forest in the City and City of Water in the ThinkCities series, Eat This!, which received starred reviews from Kirkus and School Library Journal, and What’s for Lunch? (VOYA’s Honor List). She has also written the young adult novel Big Water. Andrea lives with her family in Toronto, Ontario, where she grows vegetables, wanders the ravines and spends as much time as possible on her bike.

Illustrated by

Commended, A Junior Library Guild Selection, 2020

[M]ind-boggling and fascinating facts.

” —Quill & Quire

[An] insightful STEM offering.

” —Booklist

Educational and stylish.

” —Kirkus Reviews

Cogently fills an information gap for school and public libraries.

” —School Library Journal

[A] fantastic way to examine the urban landscape and how it affects the environment.

” —Globe and Mail

The text presents excellent information and encourages readers to become good stewards of a finite resource.

” —CM Review of Materials

Praise for author Andrea Curtis and illustrator Katy Dockrill for City of Water:

A Junior Library Guild Selection

“[M]ind-boggling and fascinating facts.” — Quill & Quire

“[An] insightful STEM offering.” — Booklist

“Educational and stylish.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Cogently fills an information gap for school and public libraries.” — School Library Journal

“[A] fantastic way to examine the urban landscape and how it affects the environment.” — Globe and Mail

"The text presents excellent information and encourages readers to become good stewards of a finite resource." — CM Review of Materials

Praise for author Andrea Curtis and illustrator Pierre Pratt for

A Forest in the City:

“The vital importance of the urban forest in relation to the welfare of city dwellers is presented with interesting information and lush illustrations. Useful for reports, projects, and classroom activities.” —

School Library Journal

“[A] book for budding environmentalists” —

Booklist

Praise for author Andrea Curtis and illustrator Peggy Collins for

Eat This!:

“Copious kid-friendly information on a vitally important topic, stylishly presented, makes this book essential. Knowledge is power.” —

Kirkus, starred review


“With appealing design and timely, research-based information, this will be a welcome addition to most library collections.” — School Library Journal, starred review

Praise for author Andrea Curtis and photographer Yvonne Duivenvoorden for

What’s for Lunch?:

“This survey of foods that international children eat for school lunch emphasizes differences while pointing to the interconnectivity of world ecology…. Curtis crafts a holistic conversation about health, poverty, and sustainability…” —

Publisher’s Weekly


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